since the lane was so kindly cut by the two neighbouring Field Dalling farmers, George Harcourt and Eric Hotblack (I am so grateful – and also annoyed at the county council since I rang and they haven’t bothered, despite the fact that it is a byroad and their responsibility) I have mostly been walking the dogs there .

I have to keep Em on the lead as he is not used to pheasants which turn his head completely, but he’s being very good now I have him on a muzzle loop halti.

the lane has been cut to its complete width; hopefully this will last through some of next year too. it means that the primroses will have a good show; they won’t be covered up by the undergrowth.

it looks like a proper green lane, with its big, full hedges almost meeting overhead where the hazels and field maples have grown into trees.

this dog rose with its bright hips is unusual, dogwood and blackthorn predominate between the hazel.

field maple always has glorious colour; this year yellow seems to predominate; in fact it’s early for autumn colour, mid-November is about the best time, and last year there was still quite a lot of colour in early December.

but many of the leaves that had turned and looked so pretty last week, pale yellow against the grey of the fog, were blown off in the storm on friday night …

and now decorate the track. mostly ash.

the oaks are generally still green, but each one has a different timing .. perhaps depending on what sunlight and weather they are exposed to in relation to their neighbours.

a big beech further down has lost most but there is still a show of orange where it has been sheltered from the wind.

most of the bracken has been cut, so we don’t have those beautiful stands of fern-shapes going yellow then rust colour, always at their best when saturated.

a few stems remain

but all the wet weather will rapidly finish them off.

some of the older oaks like this one at the bottom of Clip Street are already looking pretty threadbare. No acorns to be seen this year.