two years ago the National Trust surveyed our little churchyard for wild flowers.

church

before that it had just been strimmed and cut, all neat and tidy.

weld2

but in fact it had a good selection of wildflowers, as it had never been sprayed or fertilised.

ragwort

after two years of allowing most of it to grow through the early summer we have at least thirty different native flowering plants.

oxeye daisy

above, the rather contentious ragwort, poisonous to livestock but the only host for the cinnabar moth. and oxeye daisy.

foxglove

foxgloves,

bugle

bugle,

wildcarrot

wild carrot

weld

weld – I’ve never seen this before

vipers bugloss

and growing so close they seem to be the same plant, viper’s bugloss, I’ve only seen this in Spain, in extremadura where it covers huge fields of grass with sheets of purple flowers in a good spring.

thistle

spear thistle, the same one that is the Scottish national flower

red campion

red campion, also white and bladder campions

mullein

mullein, I think great mullein

mallow

mallow

ladies bedstraw

lady’s bedstraw

knapweed

a knapweed, possibly hard heads. also lots of plantains, hawkweed, smooth hawk’s beard, field scabious, hogweed, herb robert, yarrow, buttercup ( don’t ask me which one – there are three, all poisonous) bugloss, large white convolvulous, sow thistle, teasel, and I can see that cowslip were flowering in the spring. there are probably more tiny plants, and I may have missed other flowers too.

porch

a lovely little church, thirteenth century chancel, fourteenth century nave and tower, one window of jumbled up rescued medieval coloured glass, and some wall paintings.

it’s such a good opportunity to provide flowers for butterflies and bees, it’s a shame other local churchyards don’t do this.